Saturday, March 18, 2017

Rayonier Advanced Materials


This photo was taken last summer at Fernandina Beach on Amelia Island.

It portrays the Rayonier Advanced Materials plant which was built in 1937. "The plant produces 160,000 metric tons of softwood cellulose specialties per year.

"These high purity wood pulps are used in manufacturing photographic film, cigarette filters, whipped topping, eyeglass frames, vitamins, rayon fabric, kidney dialysis filters, toothpaste, and ice cream."

The plant employs 320 people and adds $35 million to Florida's wages annually.

14 comments:

Linda said...

Wow! Great photo, Lowell!

PerthDailyPhoto said...

I agree with Linda this is a super shot Lowell.. do you know if the fumes coming out of the funnels are toxic?

Sharon Anck said...

What a diverse amount of things are using what they produce here. Cigarette filters and ice cream?

William Kendall said...

That looks like quite a complex.

Catalyst said...

Good gosh! The mind reels.

RedPat said...

That is quite a variety of products, Lowell!

Gosia k said...

typical industrial part

bill burke said...

A nice shot Lowell. What a diverse company that I never heard of but the products I obviously have. The smokestacks are not very appealing and probably contribute to pollution.

Taken For Granted said...

What a surprising list of pro ducting containing their cellulose product. Ice cream? Really?

magiceye said...

Provider of sustenance to Florida!

Kay said...

Rayonier owned a pulp plant in the next town over from us but has sold it. They only produced paper products, mostly for telephone books. And to answer the question above about the fumes: in Washington state scrubbers had to be installed in the funnels of plants like these. The pollution is vastly reduced though the smells are often still disagreeable. At least that's how it is until the latest crew in Washington D.C. finishes returning to an "anything goes" mentality.

Marleen said...

I never knew that wood pulp had so many different purposes.

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

No idea this was out there on what I thought was a beautiful pristine island.
Does it smell? We grew up near a pulp and paper mill (it was the main employer in our podunk town on the Eastern Washington/Northern Idaho border). It smelled terrible like rotten *&*%. People said 'it smells like money'. Maybe environmental regulations have made it better by now. (While they last). Of course that mill did not make high end pulp, just the ordinary kind that goes into milk cartons and stuff -- things you can't eat or brush your teeth with. (eek).

Laura. M said...

Good manufactures and a stupefying photo!!
Un abrazo.

"Photographers deal in things which are continually vanishing and when they have vanished there is no contrivance on earth which can make them come back again." — Henri Cartier-Bresson