Wednesday, April 8, 2009

Grace Episcopal Church


Grace Episcopal Church has been a fixture in Ocala since the 19th century. Recently, however, the church split over the issue of homosexuality, especially the ordination of Bishop Eugene Robinson as a bishop.

Several hundred members departed to begin another Episcopal church which, so far as I know, will affiliate with a conservative Anglican group headed by an African bishop who is vehemently anti-homosexual.

22 comments:

Bergson said...

beautiful church with this frame of flower

magiceye said...

such a beautiful structure...
sad that society is getting so divisive and the globe is shrinking! :)

cieldequimper said...

It's a pretty little church, I like the red door. Modern life is trying for churches...

Jacob said...

CQ - Your last sentence is absolutely profound! I may have to use that in my other writing...thanks!

Lois said...

Oh my goodness...don't get me started. This split happened almost 3 years ago in my church and it has been rough. We are just starting to recover and are doing quite well now. This church reminds me of the Episcopal church I grew up in. It is beautiful!

Small City Scenes said...

Very beautiful church. I have a blog called Holy Houses where I try to profile older churches.
Too bad about the split--sometimes I wonder how 'christian' we all are. MB

JM said...

These wooden churches look so pretty! You know we don't have them here...

Halcyon said...

I like the looks of the church - it's too bad they put up that darn parking sign though.

I don't like to get into all of the politics, but it seems to me the church should be a place of acceptance - not only of those like you, but of everyone.

Vogon Poet said...

What a beautiful wooden church, the red door is great.

Juergen Kuehn said...

I love churches from the architectural aspect, Jacob.
This exterior is very elegant and gracefully. Great shot!
Greetings
Juergen

frenchie4moi said...

Love churches; especially those with red doors. Hope you are doing well and enjoyed the visit from your daughter!

Nathalie said...

What a great photo... and amazing story to boot. In France (90% catholic) you wouldn't have that. Multiple churches don't exist, I can't imagine part of the parish walking away to found another church.

Bloody depressing...
I can only agree with Halcyon that a church should be a place of acceptance, not only of those like you but of everyone, and with MB's comment wondering how christian we all are...

Jackie said...

That church looks exactly how I imagine American churches.

I heard Bishop Gene preach at St Mary's Cathedral in Glasgow last year, he was very inspirational.

Jacob said...

Jackie - I'm so glad to hear you say that. While I am not of his religious or sexual persuasion, I think he's one of the finer representatives of the church - a truly kind and decent person.

Jacob said...

@ Nathalie - Soon I shall post a photo of the largest Baptist Church in Ocala, which also split a few months ago...this division was not so much theological, however; the old-timers didn't like the new pastor.

Jarart said...

Beautifu picture as usual. It could be a painting.

Steffe said...

There are some truly weird people out there.

Mary Stebbins Taitt said...

A beautiful church, too bad about the rift.

Steve Buser said...

I love the clean uncluttered lines of the building.

Hilda said...

And people wonder why our world is such a mess! Wish we'd just learn how to get along with each other…

Lovely church though. The red doors are very striking against that stark white. I like the clean, simple lines of Episcopal churches — we don't have much of those here since we're mostly Catholic.

Antjas said...

Take away the palm trees and I would think this church was in New England, in which case, there probably wouldn't have been a split.

BeachILike said...

Gorgeous building!! It is a very impressive beautiful church.

Adelaide In Photos

"Photographers deal in things which are continually vanishing and when they have vanished there is no contrivance on earth which can make them come back again." — Henri Cartier-Bresson